Five things on Saturday (FToF #214)

Things of note for the week ending [whatever date this goes out this week].

Things of note for the week ending Satuday Feb 18th, 2017.

1. WHEN THINGS GO MISSING

As someone who may or may not be questioning his own ability to remember things as well as having to help a loved one say farewell to those he has lost of late, these reflections on loss make for compelling reading.

When we lose something, our first reaction, naturally enough, is to want to know where it is. But behind that question about location lurks a question about causality: What happened to it? What agent or force made it disappear? Such questions matter because they can help direct our search. You will act differently if you think you left your coat in a taxi or believe you boxed it up and put it in the basement. Just as important, the answers can provide us with that much coveted condition known as closure. It is good to get your keys back, better still to understand how they wound up in your neighbor’s recycling bin.

But then, it evolves.

The verb “to lose” has its taproot sunk in sorrow; it is related to the “lorn” in forlorn. It comes from an Old English word meaning to perish, which comes from a still more ancient word meaning to separate or cut apart. The modern sense of misplacing an object appeared later, in the thirteenth century; a hundred years after that, “to lose” acquired the meaning of failing to win. In the sixteenth century, we began to lose our minds; in the seventeenth century, our hearts. The circle of what we can lose, in other words, began with our own lives and one another and has been steadily expanding ever since. In consequence, loss today is a supremely awkward category, bulging with everything from mittens to life savings to loved ones, forcing into relationship all kinds of wildly dissimilar experiences.

Your recommended long read of the week.

(and it features Patti Smith too)

 

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2. FIT FOR PURPOSE VIDEO FOR THE NEWSFEED

I’m noodling on this one a fair bit at the moment. What with the ever-changing landscape of video being hurriedly forced upon us (see slide 52, here), how is any one way to market supposed to be correct?

Well, fortunately for us, Twitter and Omnicom Media Group have published some research that can at least act as a guide for content marketers.

The full report is available from Twitter and Campaign has a decent write up. The key takeouts from the latter are as follows (my comments in bold):

Tips for better in-feed videos

  • The first three seconds do not need audio to capture attention (this has been true for a while – read this as ‘subtitles/interstitials/title cards matter).
  • In-feed videos viewed in the morning are more likely to elicit a feeling of personal relevance and generate detail-orientated encoding (this is especially useful if your brand/client publishes tips  or ‘how to’ videos).
  • Videos with an early story arc are 58% more likely to be viewed (this is really interesting, especially when you put it against Facebook’s own data that 65% of 3 second views go on to watch 10secs and  45% of 10sec views go onto watch 30 – in short: grab attention and do it quickly)
  • Topical content is 32% more likely to be viewed and leads to an 11% higher completion rate (obvious).
  • The presence of people in the first three seconds is 133% more emotionally intense (traditional marketers have known about people power for decades – the channels might change, the strategy rarely ever).
  • Text (or subtitles) stimulates left-brain memory response. Videos with text are 11% more likely to be viewed and have a 28% higher completion rate (Twitter and Facebook both [currently] play video silently – not using subtitles in 2017 is like not putting paid behind your content: why bother publishing it in the first place?)
  • Dialogue is more effective than music at driving relevance, emotion and memory (this is the people thing again – see also: Cialdini).

If you’ve been following literally any of the stuff Facebook has been wanging on about in regards to editing for the newsfeed, you’ll see a lot of similarities here.

How does that all fit against Facebook’s recent news about audio being on its way to auto-play videos?

Well, maybe I’ll have something on that for you next week.

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3. BUILDING A BOT? READ THIS

Venturebeat has three very good tips for bot-builders. Not rocket science and if you’ve spent five minutes talking to me about the topic then you may already know them.

However, this is definitely a good piece to have to hand if/when you’re trying to land a point about the basics.

One for the bookmarks.

 

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4. QUESTION YOUR ANSWERS

This is excellent.

Michael K. Williams asks the question (of himself) ‘Am I being typecast?’

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5. OK, GOOGLE, WHAT CAN YOU DO?

I won (!) a Google Home a little while ago and, combined with having a Google Pixel, I’ve been slowly getting accustomed to being able to tell Google’s Assistant to do/help with the things I need.. er.. assistance with.

Thing is, it can become a little painful trying to work out what it can, and more specifically what it can’t, do. Google hasn’t been that brilliant with providing a full list of these commands.

Fortunately, a savvy chap (and NOT a Google Employee, btw) by the name of Kristijan Ristovski has taken upon himself to fix that.

 

If you use Google Assistant, in any way, shape, or form – then do look at OK GOOGLE IO.

It’s dead useful.

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Bonuses this week are all a bit self-serving.

The best kind – ha!

  • First up, the frankly amazing conference ‘ONE QUESTION‘ returns later this year (if you missed last year’s keep an eye out for my write up of that one, very soon) and tickets have just gone on sale. The one question this time around is: ‘Can we really trust technology?’ – and features speakers from Pixar (!), a former member of Obama’s White House staff (!!) and even someone from Ogilvy (!!!). Definitely worth adding to your calendar and seeing if you get along. I promise you it will be excellent.
  • Next, the rather awesome people at Business Insider have put together a list of ‘The 30 best people in advertising to follow on Twitter‘ – and muggins made the cut. I’ve no idea how or why, however, I’ve gained about 200 or so new followers since it was published and I’m stupidly chuffed to be included with such legends and luminaries. Please check out the whole list and follow the lot of them (yes, even that guy).
  • The full day of music playlists that my friend Sarah and I put together are still going and, for no real reason whatsoever, I thought I’d share the link to our latest before it’s finished. It’s currently around 3hrs or so long and we’ll cap it off when we hit 8hrs (a full day you see). So if you want a playlist that’ll slowly grow and update over time, give this a follow.

 

And that’s it.

Until next time, fam x

Five things on Sunday (FtoF #213)

Things of note for the week ending Sunday February 12th, 2017.

Things of note for the week ending Sunday February 12th, 2017.

A busy week this week and many projects either being sold in or at last coming to fruition; very exciting. Hopefully can talk about some of them soon…

In the meantime, would you like some things? Of course you would.

A random collection this week.

Oh, and one last thing before we dive in: do please recommend this newsletter to someone this week.

Thanks, y’all x

Let’s do this:

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1. THE STATE OF VIRTUAL REALITY IN 2016

I’m pretty bullish on VR becoming mainstream – at least as a gaming experience – and the numbers coming out of 2016 tell a decent enough story to support that.

  • An industry revenue figure of $1.8bn (£1.4bn)
  • 4.51m Samsung Gear VR headsets shipped
  • 750k PlayStation VR units shipped
  • HTC Vive: 420k unites
  • Oculus: 250k units

A few things to note here. First, the above numbers don’t [seem to] take into account any Google Cardboard / Daydream numbers. Admittedly the latter only launched at the back end of last year however, this time last year, the former was touting all sorts of huge usage/shipped numbers; it would be nice to get an update from the big G on those numbers…

Second, PSVR (the one I have) has done well – which pleases me! And I’m kinda shocked that Oculus, arguably the poster-child for consumer VR – is shipping at so low numbers. Then again, the price of entry at that end has only just started to come down.

Unsurprisingly, the Samsung Gear VR headsets are leading the pack. Something to do with Samsung throwing a LOT of cash at awareness – both with advertising and freebies (if any of you bought a day one Samsung phone last year, you no doubt have one of these headsets sat at home somewhere).

Point being: VR arrived in 2016. Where it goes next, we shall see…

EDIT: it’s interesting, a day or so after I drafted the above, I read this story about how Best Buy was closing/pulling around 200 or so of its 500 Oculus demo areas across the US, citing ‘seasonal changes’ –

In a statement, Oculus spokesperson Andrea Schubert told The Verge that the closures were due to “seasonal changes,” and that people could “still request Rift demos at hundreds of Best Buy stores in the US and Canada.” She noted that other retail outlets, including Microsoft stores, offer demonstrations. Affected Best Buy stores will continue to sell Rift headsets and the accompanying Touch motion controllers, and Oculus plans to keep up public demos. “We still believe the best way to learn about VR is through a live demo,” said Schubert. “We’re going to find opportunities to do regular events and pop-ups in retail locations and local communities throughout the year.”

If you believe the press, then this is the first death-knell of the end of the VR industry. I don’t believe the negative-hype. As shown above, Oculus is the highest cost and the lowest selling VR product on the market. Gaming is still the core area for VR, I think, but we’ll see what the next couple of years bring…

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2. RUSSIANS HACKING… SLOT MACHINES

According to Willy Allison, a Las Vegas–based casino security consultant who has been tracking the Russian scam for years, the operatives use their phones to record about two dozen spins on a game they aim to cheat. They upload that footage to a technical staff in St. Petersburg, who analyze the video and calculate the machine’s pattern based on what they know about the model’s pseudorandom number generator. Finally, the St. Petersburg team transmits a list of timing markers to a custom app on the operative’s phone; those markers cause the handset to vibrate roughly 0.25 seconds before the operative should press the spin button.

I mean, as cons go, this is pretty darn good. Best of all, because of the nature of the hack, there’s no immediate way to fix it.

Fascinating reading.

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3. GETTING TO MARS

This is really quite lovely.

Click and enjoy.

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4. AVENGERS INFINITY WAR

Is looking pretty spectacular.

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5. THE WORST INTERVIEW EVER?

You’ve just been given an opportunity to interview the White House Press secretary and you decide to send in this clown. Jesus.

Can you imagine if they’d actually paid attention in school?

(could be worse, they could’ve attempted to shake hands)

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Bonuses this week are as follows:

And that’s it.

This is the end.

You made it.

AREN’T YOU AMAZING?

Five things on SUNDAY [FToF #212]

Things of note for the week ending Sunday February 5th, 2017.

Things of note for the week ending Sunday February 5th, 2017.

1. USING TINDER TO FIND YOUR (PRI-)MATE

Park this one under ‘First thing here is probably going to make you smile’.

This is amazing:

Samboja, an 11-year-old orangutan at a Dutch zoo, is looking for love. Samboja and a team of scientists are foregoing the traditional approach of finding a mate and instead opting for the application many singles are currently using to find love: Tinder.

Scientists hope that by showing Samboja images of potential mates on a touchscreen device they can observe what effect appearance has on a primate’s love life. The program, dubbed ‘Tinder for Orangutans,’ is part of on-going research in the field that maps the role of emotions on animal relationships.

More here, via TNW.

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2. BRASS EYE AT 20

I’m just writing this and I’ve seen an ad saying ‘BRASS EYE – WHEN FAKE NEWS WAS FUNNY’ – on Channel 4. It seems they’re running a week dedicated to the modern-day phenomena currently gripping the western world. It should make for interesting viewing.

That aside, BRASS EYE turns 20 this month.

It was an incredible show.

Never heard of it? Go hunting on YouTube.

Feel about it the same way I do? Go revisit it anyway.

Also: the Guardian did an ace write-up/retrospective.

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3. HORIZON ZERO DAWN

I don’t indulge my love of gaming too much in this here newsletter/blog/thing of mine. At least, I don’t think I do. There’s a new game on the horizon (no pun intended) that I’m quite excited about, called ‘Horizon Zero Dawn’.

If you’re into your gaming, you might enjoy this hands-on preview that Polygon published last week. I’m quite excited about it; and it’s out at the end of Feb.

There’s a 4K trailer too.

Enjoy.

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4. PEOPLE WATCHING

This is the best thing in this entire post. ‘Ten Meter Tower‘ is a little over 16mins of pure people-watching bliss. Find the time to watch it.

Even if you just start.

It’s compelling viewing.

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5. BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN

I enjoyed this. Much.

Bruce Springsteen is asked to cover ‘You Never Can Tell’ (you’ll know it from Pulp Fiction).

And, being The Boss, he smashed it.

But to watch the band come together and figure it out along the way is brilliant.

I grinned. A lot.

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Bonuses this week are as follows:

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Thanks again for reading.

Have a great week x

 

Seven things on Sunday (FtoF #211)

Things of note for the week ending Sunday January 29th, 2017.

Things of note for the week ending Sunday January 29th, 2017.

I return to this newsletter draft as the US is at the brink of a constitutional crisis. The American Civil Liberties Union (who?) seems to be front and centre of the legal battle with the new President and, if you’re wondering what you can do to help your fellow humans (outside of retweeting a bunch of stuff, sharing videos on Facebook and very occasionally signing a petition that could make a difference) then you can donate to the ACLU here.

Step up.

Help.

Back to the draft…


A few things to cover off this week. A quick one for those of you that follow my podcast shenanigans. Stefan and I have put the show on hiatus for a little while due to both LIFE and general lack of interest in the mobile news at the moment. Yes Mobile World Congress is right around the corner but there are far more interesting / pressing things to discuss than whether or not device X carries a Snapdragon 835 or an 830.

Right? Right.

Anyway, if you’re an occasional listener or if you’ve ever listened, you can give our potentially final episode of the show right here (there are iTunes links and stuff at the link). Thanks for all the cookies.

Shall we crack on with THE THINGS?

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Thing 1: THE ANGEL OF KNIVES

I thought this, found via Buzzfeed News, was incredible. The sculpture above, a 27-foot high angel, is made from the 100,000 knives that have been handed in or collected by 41 different police forces across the UK.

The article moots the idea of it appearing on the 4th plinth at Trafalgar.

That would be immense.

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Thing 2: GET OUT THERE

Last year, in the face of Brexit, the nation woke up to a divided Britain (to date, nothing beats Andrew Marr’s 3min analysis from that same week – if you haven’t watched it, you should). As we know, London especially felt the brunt of this division. How did we not see it coming? Are we living in a bubble of our making? Do we even know any of the UK outside of the M25? Those Londoners that voted to remain in the EU asked these questions of themselves and many probably still do. But, when the way you make a living relies on your very ability to understand your audience, those questions matter just that little bit more.

This additional weight in the concern drove the Ogilvy & Mather London Planning dept to kick off a project called ‘GET OUT THERE‘ – a mission to get out of London and getaway from the all-too-easy habit of desktop brief writing. The ‘Google Planner’ is not the ad industry is or should be proud of and O&M has a mission to get rid of it completely.

The launch caused some decent debate too.

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Thing 3: TERENCE AND THE MULBERRY TREE

We’re not even out of the first month of 2017 and I’m already linking to the blog of Mr Terence Eden. Regular readers know that I’m a fan of his brilliance and this piece, by Mr Eden, is no exception.

It begins:

‘Welcome to my mulberry-induced madness’

Terence saw the above sign and he wanted to know what it meant.

This is a great read.

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Thing 4: INSIDE INSTAGRAM

Toward the tail end of 2015, Kevin Systrom, the CEO of Instagram, came to a realization: The photo-sharing app he had founded five years earlier was straying too far from its roots.

Instagram was growing, yes, and finally generating some serious ad dollars — which Facebook had been waiting for since it bought the company for $1 billion back in 2012.

But its user base was also growing, and it wasn’t all good growth: Instagram feeds that were once dominated by photos from friends and family members were becoming more impersonal.

As well as providing some decent quote fodder for that part-time Tumblr I look after, this in-depth look into Instagram’s journey from hip-filter-fun to Snapchat-feature-stealer from Recode makes for insightful reading.

Worth your time, I’d say.

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Thing 5: WHY DID BUZZFEED PUBLISH THE DOSSIER?

The editor-in-chief at Buzzfeed, Ben Smith, writing in the New York Times, outlines the two key reasons why it decided to publish the dossier that many others did not.

I don’t know where you stand/stood on the above action. Or even if you had an opinion at all. Still. It’s a good read. Both as a glimpse behind the BF curtain but also at the future of news and media itself.

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Thing 6: HESITANT EVIL

There’s a series of zombie games called Resident Evil. The latest release in the series (not the seventh but called), Resident Evil VII, came out this week and one of the unique things about it is that it is PSVR compatible.

My friend Matt, like me, hates scary games.

My friend Matt, unlike me, has decided to play RE7 in PSVR and upload the footage.

Episode one is up now.

Go have a giggle.

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Thing 7: THE GETAWAY CAR

There’s a new ad from Volvo.

[watch it on YouTube]

I’m going to end this newsletter by asking you the same question I asked on Twitter about it:

It’s a great ad but:

Could any brand have made it?

The replies to the above tweet are worth a read also.

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No bonuses this week.

It’s late. And I’m tired.

Until next week.

Whatley out x

 

 

 

 

1.5m things on Sunday (FToF #210)

Things of note for the week ending Sunday Jan 22nd, 2017.

Things of note for the week ending Sunday Jan 22nd, 2017.

Lol.

It’s been a while.

How you doing? Nice weekend? Shall we crack on with the things?

1. SCREENTIME GUIDELINES: EVIDENCE VS HYPE

I have young children and I live my life staring at screens. While I’ve made certain digital footprint decisions for my young’uns (as in, it’ll be their choice when they’ll have one – not mine) when it comes to screen time my rules are a little more fluid.

Moral panic about the impact of new technologies on our behaviour and development is not new. Socrates railed against the dangers of writing for fear that it would nurture “forgetfulness in the learners’ souls, because they will not use their memories.” One source of contemporary anxiety is “screen time”. Recently, a letter signed by a group of writers, psychologists and charity heads raised concerns that childhood health and wellbeing in the UK is declining, in part due to “increasingly screen-based lifestyles.” The signatories argued that the policy response to these concerns, first raised over a decade ago, has been half-hearted and ineffective.

While I do have a viewpoint about its limitations, I also think that the type of screen time is hugely overlooked. It seems I am not alone.

There is little evidence looking at the impact of the context of screen use, and the contentthat children encounter when using digital technologies – factors that may have a much greater impact than sheer quantity alone.

The two quotes are from an open letter than appeared in the Guardian recently and was signed by several global doctors and professors in everything from psychology to neuroscience.

Even if you don’t have kids yourself, this is definitely worth a read.

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2. GOODBYE, TWITTER LEAD GEN CARDS

These words you’re reading right now appear in two main formats. First as a blog post on whatleydude.com – aka ‘my happy place’ – and second, as a newsletter that gets sent out shortly after the former is published.

That second part is where most of my readers are (hello!) – and there are just shy of 1000 of you who get this newsletter every week. 900 of you subscribed via Twitter. Specifically Twitter’s lead generation card.

Something like this:

And now Twitter is shutting them down. Weird. But who knows why Twitter does what it does. Maybe it, like Facebook, has decided to pivot around (and go all in on) video. We shall see.

Shame though, I even wrote a handy guide on how to set them up, way back when.

Dead useful.

Now just dead.

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3. POKEMON [STILL] GO[ING]

About two or three months before Marshall and I published our annual digital trend report, I was asked to put together a preview for an internal event at Ogilvy Towers. You must understand that at this point, Marshall and I had barely had our first lunch on the topic let alone put anything down on PowerPoint. So, instead of just trying to make up a bunch of stuff in time, I took the brief and changed it.

On the day, I presented this deck – ‘Key Digital Things That We Really Didn’t Spot Coming But Wish We Did‘. The content of which is fairly predictable (but by all means go and read it) however one of the points that I wanted to land in the talk was that while the world went nuts for Pokemon Go over the summer, and that that madness has seemingly since subsided, it was still walking around with about 25m monthly active users – and that should not be ignored.

Interestingly, at the turn of the year, these revenue charts appeared that backed that up.

This thing is (still) making a LOT of cash.

Not bad for a flash in the pan.

More here.

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4. BATMAN: THE ANIMATED SERIES

I’ve wanged on before about how amazing this show is/was. And I’m not wrong.

Well, as it turns out, this was no accident.

Great reading.

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5. LONDON UNDERGROUND STATIONS BY IG TAGS

I love this.

via #TagsintheCity (other cities also available).

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Bonuses –

And that’s me – I need some sleep.

 

Whatley out.

x

Five things on Friday #209

Things of note for the week ending Friday January 6th, 2017.

Things of note for the week ending Friday January 6th, 2017.

Oh hello, 2017. And hello to you too, gorgeous reader (yes, you – you know I’m talking directly to you, don’t you?) – how have you been? Sorry to miss last week. I was busy. Holidays and stuff. We have to take breaks sometimes you know.

OK. I forgot.

But hey, I remembered this week and now have a NEW YEAR and NEW THINGS.

Onwards.

Shall we?

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1. SOCIAL MEDIA BREAKS. TAKE THEM.

I found the following piece via Jyri Engestrom. He posted it with the following quote highlighted –

“The idea of purposefully introducing into my life a service designed to fragment my attention is as scary to me as the idea of smoking would be to an endurance athlete, and it should be to you if you’re serious about creating things that matter.”

Well, when you put it like that, ‘Quit social media. Your career may depend on it.‘ makes sobering reading.

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2. THE SLOW TRAIN TO CHINA (FROM BARKING)

You guys, the BBC is reporting that China Railway is going to start a freight train service from Wiwu, China to Barking, London. This is awesome. Alright you can’t actually ride the train itself but STILL, this is awesome.

Look!

How cool is that?! A TRAIN that goes all that way! Amazing.

Admittedly, I may have done something similar before but that was from Moscow to Beijing (via Ulanbataar). Imagine being able to tap in with your Oystercard and then tap out for ACTUAL CHINESE OYSTERS (that worked better in my head).

Brilliant.

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3. CARRIE FISHER: SCRIPT DOCTOR

You may have read a few things of late about how the late Carrie Fisher was more than a metal bikini and a couple of hair buns. Well, quite. However, the following article if probably the best researched piece I could find on precisely what and how Fisher came to be one of the best script doctors in Hollywood.

Worth a read.

Other notable Carrie Fisher things worth reading:

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4. INTERNET CONNECTED FRIDGE

Any excuse to link to this website, admittedly BUT STILL, what with CES happening as I type, Internet-enabled devices are seemingly, EVERYWHERE. But what if you’re not in Las Vegas / have a ton of cash lying around to spunk on a new-fangled t’internet fridge?

Well, Terence Eden has the answer (and a How To guide).

Off you pop then, go and CONNECT YOUR FRIDGE.

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5. BEATING MEN AT THEIR OWN GAME

My first job for the team was seat-occupier – in other words, bimbo – sitting next to the famous card counter Ken Uston. That man was so egotistical, I’m surprised he thought I was good-looking enough.

It was 1978, the year Atlantic City opened for gambling. New Jersey’s state legislature had developed the city’s rules for blackjack, but unfortunately they didn’t employ a maths mind to look them over, and so allowed a technical rule that gave card counters even more of an edge.

Consequently, every counter in the world swarmed to the famous boardwalk. When the doors of the new casino, Resorts International, opened at 08:00 in the morning, there was a stampede for seats.

Cat Hulbert, writing for the BBC Magazine section (I didn’t know this was a thing) on her long career as a poker player.

Dancing with the devil.

A great read.

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Bonuses this week are as follows:

AND WE ARE DONE!

WOOOO!

Last thing – The Ogilvy Key Digital Trends 2017 doc that we published mid-last month just passed 100k views. Yay. To celebrate, Marshall and I are hosting a free webinar next week where we’ll basically read the slides to you over the course of an hour.

Fancy that? Sign up here.

LATERS.

x

Five things on Friday #208

Things of note for the week ending Friday December 23rd, 2016.

Things of note for the week ending Friday December 23rd, 2016.

1. THE BUZZFEED ANNUAL MEMO

No, not a list of the top 19 Beano Annuals, but instead a look at the memo that Buzzfeed co-founder Jonah Peretti sends to his entire company every year.

Telling the story of 2016’s digital ups and downs, as well as explaining the drivers of exactly why we are where we are today, Peretti’s take is compelling. Example:

Attention has shifted to the web, but the ad industry still treats it as second rate, not deserving of the the care, attention, and creativity they reserve for other platforms. This creates a drain on the entire system by weakening the economics of digital content, making it even harder to support quality journalism and compelling entertainment. In fact, the ad industry’s slowness to shift to digital is at the root of the problems faced by news and entertainment. Social platforms can only optimize the content uploaded to their services, and when there isn’t a solid business model for content, the void is filled with fake news, cheap entertainment, and deceptive ads.

I do not embolden lightly: This is an excellent read.

Remarkably, there are still people out there that argue or even deny Buzzfeed’s success.

Send them this article.

See what they say.

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2. SPOTIFY 2016 PLAYLIST

Mine, not yours.

Just in case you like good music.

Here are some numbers about me/mine:

And here is the playlist itself.

Hope you like it.

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3. ZUCK’S CONNECTED HOME

You’ve probably already seen the hokey videos of Mark Zuckerberg’s results from his latest yearly challenge (they’re quite PR-y and while give an ideal view of what is possible, they’re not really that demonstrative of how interesting this actually is) however, some of you may not have done the reading.

So first off, this is a pretty good read and both explains exactly how hard it is to have a truly ‘smart’ home in 2016/17 and playfully reveals how much of a geek Mark Zuckerberg [still] is; I loved reading this.

Second, in one blog post, Zuck is at peak nonchalance here, seemingly dropping huge points / ideas / notions without even trying.

Want an example? Here’s a list:

  1. Zuck says: ‘I’ve seen Iron Man, I want to build JARVIS’. I’ve noted before that, in the movies at least, JARVIS is pretty much a glorified Google Assistant so this made sense to me but to just go ahead and decide he wanted to build one? SO CASUAL.
  2. Casual suggestions for new product ideas (aka ‘big opportunities’) for AI builders.
  3. Issues huge burns to all existing smart home attempts (common APIs are needed etc – this should be headline news)
  4. Casual Facebook messenger bot plug. SO CASUAL.
  5. Still codes – ‘I haven’t built an iOS app since 2012’ – Yeah, me too Zuck, ME TOO.
  6. Just happens to reveal global trends re: voice vs text across the world’s biggest messaging apps.
  7. Highlights how nice it’d be if Amazon Echo had a mobile/away-from-home interface (like JARVIS does, y’know, the one MZ built on his own this year). Bezos wasn’t on it before, I’m sure he is now.
  8. Plugs entire Facebook Engineering Team (good job).
  9. Casual self-depreciation re: Grey t-shirt cannon (brilliant)
  10. Oh, and done all in 100hrs.

Y’know, you could easily forget that he also runs the world’s largest media internet company.

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4. WESTWORLD + GAMING

Tom Bissell is a video game writer and author. He interviewed Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan, joint creators-in-chief of the newly redux’d-for-TV, Westworld (if you’re not watching it / haven’t seen it yet etc – then do please fix it now).

With a few minor spoilers within (you have been warned) his is a fantastic read for any one who games, watches Westworld, or both (like me).

Go read.

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5. VINE IS BACK – KINDA

Twitter’s six second video platform that was recently, seemingly, consigned to the dead pool has been given a new lease of life.

Instead of killing the service completely, Twitter will be transitioning the Vine ‘app’ as we know it, to something called ‘Vine Camera’. With the new iteration of the app, you’ll still be able to snap six second videos however you’ll only have two options after that: 1. Save to Camera. 2. Publish to Twitter.

The platform is over but the app’s main product feature remains.

Interesting.

You can read more about this over at the official announcement.

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Bonuses this week are as follows:

 

 

And that’s me.

I’m done.

Have a great Christmas, gang.

Bears, Squirrels, all of you.

Whatley out.

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